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  • Writer's pictureGokhan Gureser

Understanding Scope 2 Emissions: Indirect Carbon Footprints 

Updated: Jul 5, 2023


A captivating image of electric grids against the backdrop of a stunning sunset. The silhouettes of power lines and transmission towers stand out against the vibrant colors of the sky, creating a captivating visual contrast. The interconnected network of electric grids represents the infrastructure that powers our modern world, symbolizing energy generation and distribution. The golden hues of the sunset provide a serene and awe-inspiring atmosphere to the scene
Electric Grids Illuminated by the Setting Sun

Scope 2 emissions are greenhouse gas emissions from electricity. This means that when you turn on a light, or use any other electricity, it emits greenhouse gases into the air. This is bad for the environment, because it contributes to climate change. 

 

GHG emissions are a result of human activities that emit greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Greenhouse gases (GHG) trap heat in the Earth’s atmosphere and increase the Earth’s surface temperature. The main GHGs are carbon dioxide (CO2), water vapor, methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and ozone. 

 

"GHG emissions are categorized into three scopes: scope 1, scope 2, and scope 3. ” 

Types of Scope 2 emissions 

Scope 1 emissions are from sources that are owned or controlled by the organization. Scope 2 emissions are from the consumption of electricity, steam, or heat purchased from external suppliers. Scope 3 are the indirect emissions representing all other indirect GHG emissions not included in scope 1 and 2. 

 

It is important to understand the sources of Scope 2 emissions in order to take steps to reduce them. By understanding the emissions from our own operations, we can identify opportunities for improvement and work to reduce our environmental impact. Carbonze offers companies to measure and identify most essential opportunities, and apply the carbon accounting framework to the initiatives. We facilitate to collect and upload activity data and measure carbon footprint, which you will do smoothly with Carbonze Calculation Engines. 


How do we measure Scope 2 GHGs emissions? 


To measure scope 2 GHG emissions, you need to know how much electricity the company consumed and where it was generated. This information is usually available from utility bills or energy audits. Once you have this data, you can calculate the company’s GHG emissions by multiplying the amount of electricity consumed by the associated carbon dioxide (CO2) emission factor. Scope 2 emissions can come from a variety of sources, including but not limited to:


-The burning of fossil fuels to generate electricity 

-The use of diesel generators 

-The burning of biomass 

-The incineration of waste 


Carbonze offers companies to measure Scope 1, 2, and 3 emissions, and identify most essential opportunities, and apply the carbon accounting framework to the initiatives. We facilitate to collect and upload activity data and measure carbon footprint, which you will do smoothly with Carbonze Calculation Engines. 


Understanding the Three Scopes of Emissions: Scope 1, 2, and 3 emissions 


When it comes to measuring emissions, organizations often refer to three different scopes. Scope 1 emissions include direct emissions that a company creates in its own operations, such as from fuel combustion. Scope 2 emissions account for indirect emissions associated with the consumption of purchased or acquired electricity, for example. Lastly, Scope 3 emissions occur in the value chain and cover a wide range of indirect GHG emissions, including those from the generation of purchased energy and emissions resulting from business travel. Understanding these scopes is crucial for developing an accurate emissions inventory and identifying areas for emissions reduction. 


Scope 2 Emissions: Assessing Indirect emissions in Greenhouse gas GHG emissions 


Scope 2 emissions play a significant role in an organization's carbon footprint. These emissions are the result of indirect GHG emissions associated with the generation of purchased or acquired electricity, heat, or steam consumed by the reporting company. By accounting for Scope 2 emissions, companies can gain insight into the environmental impact of their energy consumption and identify opportunities to shift towards renewable energy sources. Addressing Scope 2 emissions is a key component of any comprehensive emissions reduction strategy. 


Reducing Carbon Emissions: Strategies to Minimize Scope 2 Footprint 


To reduce their carbon emissions, organizations need to focus their efforts on Scope 2 emissions. This includes exploring renewable energy options for electricity consumption, such as installing solar panels or sourcing energy from renewable providers. By transitioning to renewable electricity sources, companies can make a significant impact on climate change mitigation and reduce their overall greenhouse gas emissions. Implementing energy efficiency measures and optimizing energy use also contribute to minimizing the Scope 2 footprint. Reducing Scope 2 emissions is an essential step towards achieving sustainability goals and building a greener future. 


The Importance of GHG Protocol: Standardizing Carbon Footprint Measurement and Reporting 

 The GHG Protocol is a widely recognized framework that standardizes how corporations measure and report their emissions. It provides guidance on accounting for both direct and indirect emissions, including Scope 1, Scope 2, and Scope 3 emissions. By adopting the GHG Protocol, organizations can ensure consistency and comparability in emissions reporting, facilitating benchmarking and transparency. This allows for more effective emissions management and the identification of improvement opportunities throughout the value chain. The GHG Protocol is a valuable tool for companies committed to addressing their greenhouse gas emissions and making informed decisions to achieve sustainable business practices.


How to reduce Scope 2 emissions Footprint 


Organizations can take a number of steps to reduce their scope 2 emissions, including increasing energy efficiency, switching to renewable sources of energy, and purchasing "green" power. By taking these steps, organizations can not only reduce their environmental impact, but also save money on their energy bills.

 

Reducing Scope 2 emissions is a priority for many organizations, as it accounts for a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Many organizations are working to reduce their Scope 2 emissions by looking for ways to improve energy efficiency and switching to lower-carbon energy sources.

 

One organization that is working to reduce its Scope 2 emissions is Walmart. The company has set a goal to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions by 18 million metric tons by 2025. To achieve this goal, Walmart is focusing on improving energy efficiency and increasing the use of renewable energy.

 

Another organization that is working to reduce its Scope 2 emissions is Apple. Apple has set a goal to power all of its facilities with renewable energy by 2030. To achieve this goal, Apple is investing in new renewable energy projects, including a solar project in China that will be the largest solar project in the world. 

 

Given the significant role that Scope 2 emissions play in overall greenhouse gas emissions, it is important for companies to understand and track these emissions. ​​In conclusion, Scope 2 emissions account for a significant amount of greenhouse gas emissions. The good news is that they are often easier to reduce than Scope 1 emissions. There are a number of ways to reduce Scope 2 emissions, including choosing renewable energy sources, using energy-efficient appliances, and reducing waste. By taking steps to reduce Scope 2 emissions, we can make a significant impact on climate change.

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